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© BJ Fogg 2019

Fogg Behavior Model

What Causes Behavior Change

The Fogg Behavior Model shows that three elements must converge at the same moment for a behavior to occur: Motivation, Ability, and a Prompt. When a behavior does not occur, at least one of those three elements is missing.

To learn many practical uses of my Behavior Model, you can apply to join my 2-day "Boot Camp in Behavior Design." 

This hands-on training is for professionals who want to create products that change people's behavior for the better. Over 95% of people who join me report (in an anonymous survey) that my Boot Camp was the best training experience of their careers.

The Fogg Behavior Model (FBM) makes it easier to understand behavior in general. What was once a fuzzy mass of psychological theories now becomes organized and specific when viewed through the FBM. 

The FBM highlights three principal elements, each of which has subcomponents. Specifically, the FBM outlines Core Motivators (Motivation), Simplicity Factors (Ability), and the types of Prompts. The subcomponents define the larger elements. For example, in the FBM the word Ability refers to the how the Simplicity Factors work together in the context of a Prompt. 

Many other people have proposed ways to understand persuasion and behavior change, dating back to Aristotle in ancient Greece. What makes the FBM different from previous work? First, the FBM shows how behavior is the result of three specific elements coming together at one moment. Next, the FBM explains the subcomponents of each element. In addition, the FBM shows that Motivation and Ability can be traded off (e.g., if motivation is very high, ability can be low). In other words, Motivation and Ability have a compensatory relationship to each other. Finally, the FBM applies most directly to practical issues of designing for behavior change. 

If you know of work related to the FBM, please share it on the page for references and connections. This will be an ongoing resource for people designing for and studying behavior change. 

If you’d like to stay updated on my work and the Fogg Behavior Model, sign up for the free newsletter. This way you will received new insights about FBM, as well as new ways to use these insights in industry and academic work.

The Fogg Behavior Model is part of a larger system that helps people design for behavior change. To see my related work (and a lot more), go to BJFogg.com

-BJ

Dr. BJ Fogg founded the Behavior Design Lab at Stanford University, where he directs research and innovation. In addition, he teaches industry innovators how to use his models and methods in Behavior Design. The purpose of his research and teaching is to help millions of people improve their lives. 

BJ is the author of Persuasive Technology: Using Computers to Change What We Think and Do. He is the co-editor of Mobile Persuasion: 20 Perspectives on the Future of Behavior Change. 

To see more of BJ's work, go to BJFogg.com

Fogg Behavior Model

For the first time ever, I explain the Behavior Model in depth for a global audience. In 200+ pages of insights, I share how to use this fundamental model, as well as other models and methods from Behavior Design, to achieve lasting change.  Order now and get my free habit-building toolkit right away. Visit: tinyhabits.com/book

What Causes Behavior Change

The Fogg Behavior Model shows that three elements must converge at the same moment for a behavior to occur: Motivation, Ability, and a Prompt. When a behavior does not occur, at least one of those three elements is missing.

The Fogg Behavior Model (FBM) makes it easier to understand behavior in general. What was once a fuzzy mass of psychological theories now becomes organized and specific when viewed through the FBM. 

The FBM highlights three principal elements, each of which has subcomponents. Specifically, the FBM outlines Core Motivators (Motivation), Simplicity Factors (Ability), and the types of Prompts. The subcomponents define the larger elements. For example, in the FBM the word Ability refers to the how the Simplicity Factors work together in the context of a Prompt. 

Many other people have proposed ways to understand persuasion and behavior change, dating back to Aristotle in ancient Greece. What makes the FBM different from previous work? First, the FBM shows how behavior is the result of three specific elements coming together at one moment. Next, the FBM explains the subcomponents of each element. In addition, the FBM shows that Motivation and Ability can be traded off (e.g., if motivation is very high, ability can be low). In other words, Motivation and Ability have a compensatory relationship to each other. Finally, the FBM applies most directly to practical issues of designing for behavior change. 

If you know of work related to the FBM, please share it on the page for references and connections. This will be an ongoing resource for people designing for and studying behavior change. 

If you’d like to stay updated on my work and the Fogg Behavior Model, sign up for the free newsletter. This way you will received new insights about FBM, as well as new ways to use these insights in industry and academic work.

 

To learn many practical uses of my Behavior Model, you can apply to join my 2-day "Boot Camp in Behavior Design." This hands-on training is for professionals who want to create products that change people's behavior for the better.

 

Over 95% of people who join me report (in an anonymous survey) that my Boot Camp was the best training experience of their careers.

The Fogg Behavior Model is part of a larger system that helps people design for behavior change. To see my related work (and a lot more), go to BJFogg.com

-BJ

Dr. BJ Fogg founded the Behavior Design Lab at Stanford University, where he directs research and innovation. In addition, he teaches industry innovators how to use his models and methods in Behavior Design. The purpose of his research and teaching is to help millions of people improve their lives. 

BJ is the author of Persuasive Technology: Using Computers to Change What We Think and Do. He is the co-editor of Mobile Persuasion: 20 Perspectives on the Future of Behavior Change. 

To see more of BJ's work, go to BJFogg.com